March 25, 1927: “will get more cold”

Friday the twenty fifth
Cloudy + cold. a depressing day. Am afriad Audrea will get more cold. Emma + Ruth came in the p.m. on the way from school. Amozelle in the a.m. full day.


NOTES + EXPLANATIONS

coming soon…


On this day in history: March 25, 1927 (Friday)

The Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi was commissioned into the Imperial Japanese Navy. After taking part in the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the Akagi was damaged and sunk six months later at the Battle of Midway.

Nanjing Incident: After a day of shelling Nanking, the United States and Britain agreed to a one-day ceasefire in return for the Kuomintang allowing the hundreds of foreigners in the city to be safely evacuated.[48] Six foreigners, three of them British, had been killed by Chinese forces. Chinese histories estimate that there were more than 2,000 Chinese casualties from the bombardment.[49] The French Communist newspaper Communite reported that 7,000 Chinese had been killed in the bombardment of Nanjing, while the U.S. State Department placed the total number of deaths and injuries “at less than 100”.

(source: Wiki)


ORIGINAL DIARY PAGES:

1927.03.23-25 - Annie F Morris diary


© Mariana Pickering and Gnarly Roots, 2015.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material (including photos) without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mariana Pickering and Gnarly Roots with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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